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Tatiana Kofyan

A Little About the Site Creator - Tatiana Kofyan - Татьяна Кофьян

Painter, graphic artist, book illustrator

Born:         February 28th 1941, Leningrad

Died:          November 23rd 2003, Kfar Saba, Israel

Below is Tatiana's biography, as she wrote it 3 years before she died (that is, in 2000).


Tatiana Kofyan (center) at her personal exhibition in Tel Aviv.

My name is Tatiana Kofyan. I have decided to start this site on a subject of great interest to me: the Russian Art in the first half of the 20-th century.

While I find the artists, their works, scan and process the pictures (yes, I have gone so far with the technology as to actually use complicated graphical computer programs), and write the basic texts, my daughter, Vera, has made this dream come true, putting together all the mystical computer side of the site, namely the design and structure, the navigation and all these other incomprehensible words. She also helps make the small biography texts readable in English, and helps translate other texts.

I have had the good fortune to come across the Russian Avant-Garde for the first time over 40 years ago, in 1959. A group of students of the Institute of Art, and I among them, was allowed into the storage cellars of the Russian museum in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg). Paintings by artists totally unfamiliar to us were hanging close together all over the stands - Chagall, Petrov-Vodkin, Filonov and many others. This collection was astonishing in its dissimilarity to everything in the upstairs exposition. Later I have met some of the old artists, who have been working in the far 20s and 30s, and even with some of Malevich's pupils, faithful to their grand instructor's teachings.


Tatiana Kofyan working at home on the "Guide to the Mammals in Israel" book.

I was born in 1941 in Leningrad, studied at the Institute of Art and later graduated from the Academy of Arts in 1969 in that same city. I work in the style of romantic realism, paint in oil and watercolor. I also use various graphic techniques such as etching, linocut and others, illustrate books for both children and adults, make precise drawings for archaeologists, zoologists and botanists. I also do various other things that most any artist is obliged to do these days - hand-drawn postcards, computer graphics and design.

My family and I immigrated to Israel in 1979, and we live in Kfar Sava with my husband Michael, and my son Jonathan. My eldest daughter Vera and her son Oded now live in a northern village close to the Lebanese border. We keep a white cat (though he is certain it's he who keeps us), who was unfortunately born deaf, so his name is immaterial.

I invite you to view some of my own work (and will add family pictures at a later time), to allow you to get to know me a little better.

Watercolors

An Evening on the Small River Poleg, by Netanya, Israel. 1998.

Hibiscus. 1988.

Thorns.

A Tree Branch.

An Old Mill. Canada. 1997.

Chamomile Flowers. 1995.

A Yard in Bulgaria.

 

A Bulgarian Landscape. 1995.

 

A Dried Artichoke. Still Life in Three Colors. 1982.

Watercolor and ink.

Wild Flowers.

 

Castle. France.

 

An English Village.

 

Landscape. France. 1983. 

 

Nasturziums. 

 

Gerberas in Terracota Jug. 1981. 

 

Roofs. Old City, Jerusalem. 1985. 

Pink Flowers in a Crystal Vase. 

Pink Flowers in a Crystal Bowl. 

Red Roses on Blue. 

Roses in Fancy Bottles. 

Watercolor and color pencils.

Sunflowers in a Blue-and-White Vase. 

 

Wild Flowers in a Blue Pitcher. 

 

Red Flowers in a Glass Vase. 

 

Wild Flowers in a Glass Vase. 1986. 

 

Trees.

 

A Village in Champagne, France. 1983.

 

A Village in Savoy. France. 1983.

 

A Village in Savoy. France. 1983.

 

Green Lemons. Still Life in Three Colors.

Watercolor and Indian ink.

Sunflowers. 1989.

 

Herzliya. Israel.

 

Autumn in the Mountains. Bulgaria.

 

Moledet (now Zeev Geller) str. in Kfar Sava.

 

 

Oils

Still Life with an Alarm Clock. 1980.

Sugar Bowl and a Bronze Mortar and Pestle. 1981.

A Cock in a Carafe. 1981.

Still Life with a Mirror. 1983.

The Western Wall. Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.

View Towards the City of David, Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.

Narrow Street in Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.

Arch of the "Khurva" (Ruin) Sinagogue, Jerusalem, Old City. 1985.

View of the Shalshelet (Chain) Str. from Temple Mt., Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.
Photograph of the same view from 1920s.

A Street in the Jewish Quarter, Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.

Old City in the Moonlight. Jerusalem. Jaffa Gate. 1985.

A Street in Old City, Akre. View Towards the Al Jazaar Mosque. 1985.

The City of David, Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.

The Western Wall. Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.

The Western Wall Prayer at Night. Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.

The Fisherman's Warf, Old City, Akre. 1985.

Entrance to the Market at Old City, Jerusalem. 1985.

An Old Olive Tree. Old City Jerusalem in the Background. 1985.

Yellow Chrysanthemums. 1987.

 

Chamomile and Amber Bracelet. 1987.

 

Flowers in Ceramic Vase Against Antique Brocade Screen. 1987.

 

Old Style Still Life With Gun, Blue Flask and Quills. 1987.

On the Lake.

Cityscape. Moledet Str. (now Zeev Geller) in Kfar-Sava. Israel. 1990.

A Horse.

Tiger Lilies.

Walls of the Old City, Akre. 1997.

 

Early Work

Portrait of Frida Budnyatzkaya. Late 1950s.

Tempera on paper.

Bottle and fruit. Study, work for 1st year at the School of Arts. 1959.

Watercolor on paper.

Fruit on a Green Tablecloth. 1962.

Tempera on cardboard.

Smolny Cathedral in St.Petersburg. Late 1960s.

Watercolor on paper.

Portrait of Simkha Samsonovna Kofyan, Tatiana's grandmother. Late 1960s.

Gouache on paper.

Pushkin Museum on Moika str. in St.Petersburg. View on the museum library (former stables). Late 1960s.

Watercolor on paper.

Kukiny Palaty in St.Petersburg. Late 1960s.

Watercolor on paper.

Poppies. Study. Late 1960s.

Watercolor on paper.

Coffee Set on the Table. Late 1960s-early 1970s. Painted at Krasnaya Konnitza str..

Watercolor and ink on paper.

Green Wine Glasses and Easter Eggs. Late 1960s-early 1970s. Painted at Krasnaya Konnitza str..

Watercolor on paper.

Bouquet of Wild Flowers. Study. Late 1960s-early 1970s. Painted at Krasnaya Konnitza str..

Watercolor on paper.

Still Life. Study. Late 1960s-early 1970s. Painted at Krasnaya Konnitza str..

Watercolor and Indian ink on paper.

Quince Fruit on a White Tablecloth. Study. Early 1970s. Painted in Tatiana's workshop, alongside her students.

Watercolor on paper.

Three Jugs. Study. Early 1970s. Painted in Tatiana's workshop, alongside her students.

Watercolor on paper.

A Red Bouquet. Study. Early 1970s. Painted in Tatiana's workshop, alongside her students.

Watercolor on paper.

Coffee Grinder and Poppies. 1973. Painted in Tatiana's workshop, a gift to her mother, Seraphima Alexandrovna Kofyan.

Tempera on paper.

Ruins. Gantiadi, Georgia. Study. 1978.

Watercolor and color pencils on paper.

Landscape. Batumi, Georgia(?). 1970s.

Watercolor on paper.

A Street in an Old Town.

Watercolor on paper.

An Old Church.

Watercolor on paper.

Dried Flowers in a White Jug and Lemons. 1970s.

Watercolor on paper.

Pink Flowers in a Jug and Apples. 1970s. Painted in Tatiana's workshop, alongside her students.

Watercolor on paper.

Tulips in a Jug. Study. 1970s. Painted in Tatiana's workshop, alongside her students.

Watercolor on paper.

Ajaria, Georgia. 1975.

Watercolor on paper.

Kobuleti, Georgia. 1975.

Watercolor on paper.

Kobuleti, Georgia. 1975.

Watercolor on paper.

Ajaria, Georgia. 1975.

Oil on cardboard.

Tsikhisdziri, Georgia. 1978.

Watercolor on paper.

 

Archaeology Drawings

For many years Tatiana has worked in archaeological drawing for several leading archaeologists in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa. Her drawings accompanied their discoveries in journals and periodicals published in Israel and abroad.

It all began when my mother was accepted to work in Israel Museum in Jerusalem, for the renown archaeologist Ruth Amiran (you may learn more about her at the Brown University website, Wikipedia, Jewish Women's Archive, or just by doing a search), in the early 1980s. I used to visit the museum several times a week and grew to know everybody in the archaeological department. The process of matching pottery pieces and then painstakingly restoring ancient pots and jugs was fascinating to discover and participate, for a while.

Then we moved to a different city, and Tatiana began doing this work from home, for several arachaeologists, one of them - the world famous Dr.Gabi Barkay (you may learn more about him at the Wikipedia website, or by doing a search). She would receive cardboard boxes full of indistinguisahble (to my eyes) pottery shards, black lumps of corroded metal, ancient terracota oil lamps or aquaduct elements - and feel this exalted wonder at their age and history. What I, as a teenager, saw as a boring lump of matter, she perceived thousands of years worth of human history in the land of Israel. I know now that she was right.


Tatiana Kofyan (left) receiving work for archaeologists.

Then Dr.Gabi Barkay has brought to her one of his most famous finds: small silver plaques containing the priestly benediction from the Book of Numbers. To me they looked like pieces of crumpled metal foil, but they filled my mother with rapturous delight. She respected and admired Dr.Barkay very much, reverred him for his unorthodox and rather daring methods to pursue his hunches where other archaeologist were stumped by difficulties. This extraudinary find was published in the journal "Cathedra", number 52, in the summer of 1989. Below, I bring some of the drawings from this issue, kindly provided by Yad Ben Zvi publishing, since I do not have the issue. The article appeared, naturally, in Hebrew. You may find some more on it here.

The Ketef Hinom site has yielded a lot of amazing material, and it has been published in various sources. I bring drawings from some of them below.

In addition, I wanted to give you an idea of what this process looked like, and I have chosen a number of her raw pencil drawings, sketches, which were done and then transferred to the pen and ink versions published in periodicals.

Any additions to this page shall be announced in the What's New page and the Newsletter (see Archive).

Published Drawings

Cover of Journal "Cathedra. History of the Land of Israel and Its Settlement", #52, Tamuz 5739 (July-August 1989). Yad Ben Zvi publishing, Jerusalem.
In the circle hands are seen unrolling the silver scroll announce the central article.

First page of article "Priestly Benediction on Silver Plaques from Ketef Hinom in Jerusalem" by Gabi Barkay.

 

Priestly Benediction on Silver Plaques from Ketef Hinom in Jerusalem" by Gabi Barkay. Journal "Cathedra. History of the Land of Israel and Its Settlement", #52, Tamuz 5739 (July-August 1989). Yad Ben Zvi publishing, Jerusalem.
The two rolled scrolls, four views.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Priestly Benediction on Silver Plaques from Ketef Hinom in Jerusalem" by Gabi Barkay. Journal "Cathedra. History of the Land of Israel and Its Settlement", #52, Tamuz 5739 (July-August 1989). Yad Ben Zvi publishing, Jerusalem.

The unrolled scroll #1, deciphered.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Priestly Benediction on Silver Plaques from Ketef Hinom in Jerusalem" by Gabi Barkay. Journal "Cathedra. History of the Land of Israel and Its Settlement", #52, Tamuz 5739 (July-August 1989). Yad Ben Zvi publishing, Jerusalem.

The unrolled scroll #2, deciphered.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Priestly Benediction on Silver Plaques from Ketef Hinom in Jerusalem" by Gabi Barkay. Journal "Cathedra. History of the Land of Israel and Its Settlement", #52, Tamuz 5739 (July-August 1989). Yad Ben Zvi publishing, Jerusalem.

Writing on the back of scroll #2, deciphered.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Priestly Benediction on Silver Plaques from Ketef Hinom in Jerusalem" by Gabi Barkay. Journal "Cathedra. History of the Land of Israel and Its Settlement", #52, Tamuz 5739 (July-August 1989). Yad Ben Zvi publishing, Jerusalem.

The layout of the findings.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Priestly Benediction on Silver Plaques from Ketef Hinom in Jerusalem" by Gabi Barkay. Journal of the Institute of Archaeology of Tel Aviv University, vol.19, #2, 1992.

Golden and silver amulet cases from Phoenician sites in Sardinia and North Africa. Egyptian rolled-up papyrus amulet and its wooden case.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Silver earrings. Silver signet ring engraved with galloping griffin.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

"Ketef Hinom. A Treasure Facing Jerusalem Walls" by Gabriel Barkay. The Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Seal insrcribed with a name Palta in Hebrew script. Tiny silver con, probably minted on the Island of Kos.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Sketches

Clay Jug. Finished drawing, some corrections required. 1994.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Clay Oil Lamp. Finished drawing, some corrections required. 1995.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Seal. Finished drawing, some corrections required.

Indian ink and rapidograph pen on semi-transparent paper.

Silver, Gold and Bronze Earrings. Sketch drawing.

Pencil on paper.

Silver, Gold and Bronze Rings. Sketch drawing.

Pencil on paper.

Silver Earrings. Sketch drawing.

Pencil on milimeter paper.

Glass Vessels. Sketch drawing.

Pencil on milimeter paper.

Clay Oil Lamps. Sketch drawing.

Pencil on milimeter paper.

Clay Oil Lamps. Sketch drawing.

Pencil on milimeter paper.

 

Judaica

Among the many different things Tatiana has done in her life as an artist in Israel was some work in the field of Judaica.

Judaica may be called the Jewish "applied art", because usually the target is not the art, but the application thereof. Naturally, there was application of art in any and every religion and culture, not just Judaism. However, usually, the art was also directed in the pure art, for the glory of God, for beauty - such as paintings and sculpture, or for personal decoration. Judaism did not allow paintings and sculpture in general, but that did not mean there were no artists. Therefore the artists had to divert and express their talent in other ways, still acceptable for the culture.

Judaica is the things used in Judaism for ritual and culture: metal workers make beautiful candle holders; Hannukiot (Hannukah candle holder); Menoras; kidush (wine blessing) goblets; cups for washing hands; tops of Torah scrolls; finger-pointer for reading the scripture; Passover platters; etc., mostly silver, but sometimes from other metals as well. The porcelain artists make certain items for kosher eating; Passover platters; Mazzah plates; Khalah (Sabbath bread) platters and other necessary items. Then there are documents richly decorated with ornaments, such as Ketubah (the marriage document); scripture; Psalms; Passover Hagadah (tale); the books of Esther or Ruth etc. Later there was the work of glass and stained-glass windows, for synagogues, the making of lanterns and furniture for the same, some architecture. Synagogues were never glorious or richly decorated, for many reasons, one of which was instability of life, but another, no less important, was the prohibition on certain forms of art and the reluctance to experiment in that field for fear of overstepping the thin boundary. Good workmanship and simplicity was usually more than enough, in stark contrast to the wealth of art

Tatiana has taken part in decorating a number of various Judaica documents. Sadly, the only origin for the pictures is photos she has taken of these works before giving them to the ordering party. These are not good quality, but all that I have. Still, I would like to give you a glimpse of Tatiana's versatility in the fields of her work, so I have done all I can to make them as presentable as possible.

Any additions to this page shall be announced in the What's New page and the Newsletter (see Archive).

Judaica Documents

Decorated Paper for Ketubah Document (marriage contract).

Watercolor on paper.

Border and Title Letter "M" for a Book.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

Illumination of Psalm 128.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

Blessing on Wine.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

"Ma Nishtana", the 4 Questions from the Passover Seder. A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

A Page from the Passover Hagada.

Watercolor and gold paint on paper.

If I Forget You, Jerusalem, May My Right Arm Go Numb". Psalm 137:5.
Combined from 2 partial photographs.

Watercolor and gold paint on papercut.

Other Jewish-minded Work

Invitation to a Wedding. 1980.

Indian ink on paper.

"Shir Sameakh" (A Happy Song). A Song Card in Russian and Hebrew, for Ex-Russian New Repatriants. Published by Association "Tarbut". Face. Back.

 

"Kinneret Tale" (Tale of the Sea of Galilee). A Song Card in Russian and Hebrew, for Ex-Russian New Repatriants. Published by Association "Tarbut". Face. Back.

 

"I Am Purim" (A Purim Song). A Song Card in Russian and Hebrew, for Ex-Russian New Repatriants. Published by Association "Tarbut". Face. Back.

 

"Will Rejoice" (A Sabbath Song). A Song Card in Russian and Hebrew, for Ex-Russian New Repatriants. Published by Association "Tarbut". Face. Back.

 

Illustration of One of the OT Stories for a Collective Book by a large number of Israeli Artists (I do not have the details of this book, but will continue searching for it).

Watercolor on paper.

 

"The Word and the Deed" (Slovo i Delo), by Valentin Pikul. Vol. I+II.

Lenizdat, 1974. Leno-cuts.

As an unexpected and unique surprize, I have included wih some of the illustrations the original linocut plates. Many of you have never seen what they look like. I have been fortunate to have watched them being cut.

"The Word and the Deed" (Slovo i Delo), by Valentin Pikul. Vol. I. Cover.

This is a historical novel, set against the period of Empress Anna, daughter of Iohann. All illustrations leno-cuts, prints on paper.

Vol. I, title page.
"The Queen of the Terrible Face" (Tzaritza Prestrashnogo Zraku).

 

Book One. "The Sovereign's Bride" (Gosudareva Nevesta).

 

Book One, Chapter One.

Including the original linocut plate.

Book Two. "The Time of the Boyars" (Boyarskaya Pora).

 

Book Two, Chapter One.

Including the original linocut plate.

Book Three. "Imperatix".

 

Book Three, Chapter One.

Including the original linocut plate.

"The Proud and the Scoundrels" (Gordetzy i Podletzy).

 

Book Four, Chapter One.

Including the original linocut plate.

Book Five. "To the Sound of Beating Drums" (Pod Boi Barabanov).

 

Book Five, Chapter One.

Including the original linocut plate.

Vol. II, cover.

 

VolI. I, title page.

"My dear confidantes" (Moi liubeznye konfidenty)

 

 

Book One. "On the borders" (Na Rubezhakh).

 

Book One, Chapter One.

 

Book Two. "Bahchisarai".

 

Book Two, Chapter One.

Including the original linocut plate.

Book Three. "The Deeds of Men" (Dela Ludskie).

 

Book Three, Chapter One.

Including the original linocut plate.

Book Four. "Confidantes".

 

Book Four, Chapter One.

 

Book Five. "Epilogue".

 

Book Five, Chapter One.

Including the original linocut plate.

Last Book. "Russia's Turnabouts" (Rossiya na Povorotakh).

 

"Bloody Anna" (Anna Krovavaya).

 

Genealogy.

 

Tail-piece.

 

 

"The ShkID Republic", by G.Belykh and L.Panteleev. Karelia, 1979.

An autobiographical novel, describing the life of orphan boys at the ShkID (school by the name of Dostoyevsky), at the very beginning of the USSR.

This book includes 76 colored and 31 black-and-white illustrations.

Watercolor, and colored pencils, in three-color spectrum. Chapter intro pictures done in graphite pencil on paper.

Note: Eleven original pictures are missing. Some of them were scanned from the printed book, however the quality there is low. As soon as the originals are located I shall replace them.

Flash page-flipping e-book

For purposes of supporting this website, this book was also turned into a full Flash-page-flipping e-book. You may purchase it at any time through contacting us, and by this help support our website. It would also make an excellent gift!

On other ways to support us see page Make a Difference (it will not affect your browsing).

"The ShkID Republic". Cover.

In the printed version blue background was replaced with brown and orange text with silver.

The inside cover (double spread). Map of "Uliganstadt".

 

1. Title page.

 

2. Chapter 1 intro, p.4.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version, regrettably, low quality)

3. For Chapter 1, p.7.

 

4. Chapter 2 intro, p.10.

 

5. For Chapter 2, p15.

 

6. Chapter 3 intro, p.19.

 

7. For Chapter 3, p.23.

 

8. For Chapter 3, p.26.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version)

9. Chapter 4 intro, p.27.

 

10. For Chapter 4, p.31.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version, regrettably, low quality)

11. For Chapter 4, p.34.

 

12. For Chapter 4, p.38.

 

13. For Chapter 4, p.39.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version, regrettably, low quality)

.

14. Chapter 5 intro, p.43.

 

15. For Chapter 5, p.46.

 

16. For Chapter 5, p.51.

 

17. Chapter 6 intro, p.53.

 

18. For Chapter 6, p.58.

 

19. For Chapter 6, p.59.

 

20. For Chapter 6, p.63.

 

21. For Chapter 6, p.68.

 

22. For Chapter 6, p.69.

 

23. Chapter 7 intro, p.73.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version)

24. Chapter 7, p.77.

 

25. Chapter 8 intro, p.81.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version)

26. For Chapter 8, p.86.

 

27. For Chapter 8, p.90.

 

28. Chapter 9 intro, p.103.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version)

29. For Chapter 9, p.108.

 

30. For Chapter 9, p.118.

 

31. For Chapter 9, p.122.

 

32. For Chapter 9, p.123.

 

33. For Chapter 9, p.126.

 

34. For Chapter 9, p.132.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version, regrettably low quality)

35. Chapter 10 intro, p.135.

 

36. For Chapter 10, p.137.

 

37. Chapter 11 intro, p.142.

 

38. For Chapter 11, p.146.

 

39. For Chapter 11, p.150.

 

40. For Chapter 11, p.151.

 

41. Chapter 12 intro, p.155.

 

42. For Chapter 12, p.158.

 

43. For Chapter 12, p.169.

 

44. Chapter 13 intro, p.173.

 

45. Chapter 14 intro, p.189.

 

46. For Chapter 14, p.194.

 

47. Chapter 15 intro, p.196.

 

48. For Chapter 15, pp.202-203.

 

49. Chapter 16 intro, p.206.

 

50. For Chapter 16, pp.210-211.

 

51. For Chapter 16, p.215.

 

52. Chapter 17 intro, p.217.

 

53. Chapter 18 intro, p.231.

 

54. Chapter 19 intro, p.237.

 

55. For Chapter 19, p.242.

 

56. Chapter 20 intro, p.245.

 

57. For Chapter 20, p.250.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version, regrettably, low quality)

58. For Chapter 20, p.258.

 

59. For Chapter 20, p.267.

 

60. Chapter 21 intro, p.269.

 

61. For Chapter 21, p.275.

 

62. For Chapter 21, p.278.

 

63. Chapter 22 intro, p.280.

 

64. For Chapter 22, p.282.

 

65. For Chapter 22, p.290.

 

66. Chapter 23 intro, p.294.

 

67. For Chapter 23, p.298.

(Original missing, scanned from the printed version, regrettably, low quality)

68. For Chapter 23, p.302.

 

69. Chapter 24 intro, p.306.

 

70. For Chapter 24, p.313.

(Original missing, printed picture in very low quality)

71. Chapter 25 intro, p.316.

 

72. Chapter 26 intro, p.323.

 

73. For Chapter 26, p.331.

 

74. Chapter 27 intro, p.333.

 

75. For Chapter 27, p.337.

 

76. Chapter 28 intro, p.339.

 

77. Chapter 29 intro, p.344.

 

78. For Chapter 29, p.349.

 

79. For Chapter 29, p.352.

 

80. Chapter 30 intro, p.355.

 

81. Chapter 31 intro, p.361.

 

 

"A Guide to Mammals in Israel", by Benny Shalmon.

Keter publ., 1993.

This book has over 100 delightful lifelike illustrations of a surprising variety of mammals found in Israel. It has been an endless source of fun and invaluable information for our whole family in the process of its illustration. You can read this story below. It's been our family's very favorite, and we hope you join us and enjoy the fruits of Tatiana's labor.

"A Guide to Mammals in Israel". Cover.

The book is a part of a series of guides this publisher produced over the years. All illustrations done in watercolor, whitening and Indian ink on paper.

1. Eastern (East European) Hedgehog.

Erinaceus concolor

2. Long-Eared Hedgehog.

Hemiechinus auritus

3. Desert (Ethiopian) Hedgehog.

Paraechinus aethiopicus

4. Lesser White-Toothed Shrew.

Crocidura suaveolens

5. Bicolored White-Toothed Shrew.

Crocidura leucodon

6. Savi's (Pygmy) White-Toothed Shrew.

Suncus etruscus

7. Egyptian Fruit-Bat.

Rousettus aegyptiacus

8. Larger Rat-tailed Bat. 9. Lesser Rat-Tailed Bat.

Rhinopoma microphyllum. Rhinopoma hardwickii

10. Naked-Bellied Tomb Bat.

Taphozous nudiventris

11. Egyptian Tomb Bat.

Taphozous perforatus

12. Egyptian Slit-Faced Bat.

Nycteris thebaica

13. Greater Horseshoe Bat.

Rhinolophus ferumequinum

14. Geoffroy's (Cretzschmar's) Horseshoe Bat.

Rhinolophus clivosus

15. Mediterranian Horseshoe Bat.

Rhinolophus euryale

16. Mehely's Horseshoe Bat.

Rhinolophus mehelyi

17. Blasius' Horseshoe Bat.

Rhinolophus blasii

18. Lesser Horseshoe Bat.

Rhinolophus hipposideros

19. Trident Leaf-Nosed Bat.

Asellia tridens

20. European Free-Tailed Bat.

Tadarida teniotis

21. Egyptian Free-Tailed Bat.

Tadarida aegyptiaca

22. Geoffroy's Bat.

Myotis emarginatus

23. Natterer's Bat.

Myotis nattereri

24. Long-Fingered Bat.

Myotis capaccinii

25. Greater Mouse-Eared Bat.

Myotis myotis

26. Lesser Mouse-Eared Bat.

Myotis blythii

27. Serotine.

Eptesicus serotinus

28. Botta's Serotine.

Eptesicus bottae

29. Schlieffen's Bat.

Nycticeinops schlieffeni

30. Kuhl's Pipistrelle.

Pipistrellus kuhlii

31. Common Pipistrelle.

Pipistrellus pipistrellus

32. Savi's Pipistrelle.

Pipistrellus savii

33. Desert Pipistrelle.

Pipistrellus Ariel

34. Bodenheimer's Pipistrelle.

Pipistrellus bodenheimeri

35. Kuppel's Pipistrelle.

Pipistrellus rueppellii

36. Hemprich's Long-Eared Bat.

Otonycteris hemprichii

37. Grey Long-Eared Bat.

Plecotus austriacus

38. Long-Winged Bat (Schreibe's Bat).

Miniopterus scheibersii

39. Eastern (Arabian) Barbastelle.

Barbastella leucomelas

40. Noctule.

Nyctalus

41. Cape Hare.

Lepus capensis

42. Persian Squirrel.

Sciurus anomalus

43. Grey Hamster.

Cricetulus migratorius

44. Northern Water Vole.

Arvicola terrestris

45. Sicial (Gunther's) Vole.

Microtus socialis (guentheri)

46. Snow Vole.

Microtus nivalis

47. Anderson's Gerbil.

Andersoni allenbyi

48. Greater Egyptian Gerbil.

Gerbillus pyramidum

49. Lesser Egyptian Gerbil.

Gerbillus gerbillus

50. Cheesman's Gerbil.

Gerbillus cheesmani

51. Baluchistan Gerbil.

Gerbillus nanus

52. Wagner's Gerbil.

Gerbillus dasyurus

53. Pygmy Gerbil.

Gerbillus henleyi

54. Bush-Tailed Jird.

Sekeetamys calurus

55. Fat Sand Rat (Fat Jird).

Psammomys obesus

56. Tristram's Jird.

Meriones tristrami

57. Buxton's Jird (Negev Jird).

Meriones sacramenti

58. Sandevall's Jird.

Meriones crassus

59. Lybian Jird.

Meriones libycus

60. Broad-Toothed (Rock) Mouse.

Apodemus mystacinus

61. Yellow-Necked Mouse.

Apodemus flavicollis

62. Hermonian Mouse.

Apodemus hermonensis

63. Cairo Spiny Mouse.

Acomys cahirinus (dimidiatus)

64. Golden Spiny Mouse.

Acomys russatus

65. House Mouse.

Mus musculus

66. Short-Tailed Bandicoot Rat.

Nesokia indica

67. House Rat (Ship Rat).

Rattus rattus

68. Common (Brown) Rat.

Rattus norvegicus

69. Asian Garden Dormouse.

Eliomys melanurus

70. Forest Dormouse.

Dryomys nitedula

71. Lesser Egyptian Jerboa.

Jaculus jaculus

72. Greater Egyptian Jerboa.

Jaculus orientalis

73. Palestine Mole Rat.

Spalax ehrenbergi

74. Coypu.

Myocastor coypus

75. Indian Crested Porcupine.

Hestrix indica

76. Wolf.

Canis lupus

77. Golden Jackal.

Canis aureus

78. Red Fox.

Vulpes vulpes

79. Sand Fox.

Vulpes rueppellii

80. Blandford's Fox.

Vulpes cana

81. Fennec.

Vulpus (Fennecus) zerda

82. Eurasian Badger.

Meles meles

83. Ratel, Honey Badger.

Mellivora capensis

84. Marbled Polecat.

Vormela peregusna

85. Beech Marten.

Martes foina

86. European Otter.

Lutra lutra

87. Weasel.

Mustela nivalis

88. Egyptian Mongoose.

Herpestes ichneumon

89. Small-Spotted Genet.

Genetta felina

90. Striped Hyaena.

Hyaena hyaena

91. Wild Cat.

Felis silvestris

92. Jungle Cat.

Felis chaus

93. Sand Cat.

Felis Margarita

94. Caracal.

Felis (caracal) caracal

95. Leopard.

Panthera pardus

96. Cheetah.

Acinonyx jubatus

97. Syrian Rock Hyrax.

Procavia capensis

98. Onager, Asiatic Wild Ass.

Equus hemionus

99. Wild Boar.

Sus scrofa

100. Roe Deer.

Capreolus capreolus

101. Mesopotamian Fallow Deer.

Dama (Cervus) mesopotamica

102. Mountain Gazelle.

Gazella gazella gazella

102b. Prairie Gazelle.

Gazella gazella ssp.

103. Dorcas Gazelle.

Gazella dorcas

104. Nubian Ibex.

Capra ibex

105. Arabian Oryx.

Oryx leucoryx

The Story of This Book

At the time this book was being illustrated, I was studying at the Technion, Haifa.

Every time I called, I would naturally ask my mother what she was doing at the moment. We have always loved play on words, and it has always been, and remains with me, a favorite pastime. So she would answer something like "mousing", "squirrelling" or "hedgehogging", according to the animal she was drawing at the time (only in Russian, of course).

Animal drawing wasn't usual for her. But like every project she did, my mother was passionate about the subject. This book was made in Hebrew, with the English and Latin names of the animals the only exception. She did not know the names of most of these animals in either of the three languages. So she would look up the names of strange or unfamiliar animals, delighting in putting together something she has seen or read about in the distant past with the current picture and book. We would laugh together at the silly-sounding Latin names, such as the triple gazella (item 102), or the double hyaena (item 90).

She got ridiculously excited about some trivia, and would give it to me over the phone. Thus I got to know there were over 30 types of bats in Israel - an indispensable piece of knowledge, I thought to myself. Then I went and promptly frightened one of my roommates into insomnia - she was not aware of ANY bats living in Israel and was terrified of the poor harmless creatures.

Another time we have learned the erronious use of the name "zayatz" (something like "hare") for the animals which were, actually, rabbits in Russia and Russian folk lore, and consequently in Israel, as Israeli folk lore and modern Hebrew language was mainly put together by immigrants from Russia, who brought their linguistic errors with them. We learned of the strange animals called "Syrian Rock Hyrax", or rock coney, rock "shafan" in Hebrew, who live all over the place and whose closest relatives appear to be... elephants. Mother was endlessly amused by this fact and that it had something to do with the development of toenails.

The rock coney, it appears, is the real "zayaz". The age-long error was due to the fact that in Europe and Russia this animal is not known, being a resident of the Mediterranian countries and the Middle East. So they took it to be something like a rabbit.

An interesting historical fact is that these animals gave Spain its name. In Hebrew, and in the bible, this animal is called "shafan". The early sea-faring Israelite tribe of Naftali (according to some historians) sailed across the Mediterranian sea and stumbled upon what they thought of as an island, populated with lots of "shfanim" (the plural of "shafan"), scattering every which way at their approach. So they named the land "shafan island" (i hashfanim), which was later transcribed hi-shpanim - to become "hispania" (España).

Fascinating, this trivia was to my mother. And she was quite right, too.

Now my son and I take out the book and look-up all about the many Israel-dwelling bats, following Batman's series. It means a lot to him that his grandmother illustrated the book.

We live in the Upper Galilee, and many of the above featured mammals are thriving here. Nightly we go to sleep to the jackals' song, we see them cross the road, fleeing the cars when we drive. There are boars, badgers, foxes, mogooses, hedgehogs, bats and whatnot. And each time I see them I think of this book and the fun we had when my mother was working on it. Now isn't it just the best way to remember someone?

Vera Kofyan

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